Geometry: Lines & Angles Songs For Kids | 3rd Grade – 5th Grade

Geometry: Lines & Angles Songs For Kids | 3rd Grade – 5th Grade


Cylinders look like soda cans. They’re the shape of pots and pans. They have two circular bases
that are congruent and parallel faces. You see cones in construction zones
or when you’re eating ice cream cones. All points of their circular base meet at
the same point, like a party hat! These are all three -dimensional shapes. They all have a base and take up space. These are all three -dimensional shapes. The 3 dimensions are height, width, and length. Pyramids are what the ancient Egyptians made;
the Mayans and the Aztecs did the same. They’re made with a polygon at the base
and triangular faces that meet in one place. Some prisms are rectangular like a room. Some prisms are triangular like a roof. Polygons with edges joining at the vertices
make a prism, as you can see! These are all three -dimensional shapes. They all have a base and take up space. These are all three -dimensional shapes. The 3 dimensions are height, width, and length. There’s one special three -dimensional shape. They’re called spheres, like the planets
in outer space. On spheres, there’s no base to be found,
because every sphere is perfectly round! Between zero and ninety an angle is acute. This angle’s small and skinny and kind of
cute. It looks like a V or the top of a Y
or the angles that you see eating pizza or pie. Angles are measured in degrees,
and here’s how to remember them with ease! Only when an angle measures ninety do we call
it right. You can tell this angle just by sight. It looks like an L or the corner of a square. You’re looking at them when you’re walking
up the stairs. Angles are measured in degrees,
and here’s how to remember them with ease! Between ninety and one hundred eighty, an
angle is obtuse. This angle’s kind of fat; it’s got a big
caboose. It’s like the hands on a clock when it’s
quarter to two or the antlers on the head of a full grown
moose. Angles are measured in degrees,
and here’s how to remember them with ease! To Measure An Angle’s Degrees with a protractor
Place the vertex at the hole in the center. Line up the the bottom ray with zero on the
protractor Remember that zero can be on top or under. Count up to where the other ray points at
the number. That will be the angle’s measure. Angles are measured in degrees,
and here’s how to remember them with ease! You’ll find lines that are perpendicular
on a rectangle’s perimeter. Or let’s break it down even simpler: they
make right angles in particular. Parallel lines never meet;
intersecting lines make v’s; perpendicular lines meet at 90 degrees;
put your hands in the air with me!! Parallel…
intersecting… perpendicular… They’re rectangular! Now, let’s talk about detecting
if two lines are intersecting. It’s the term that we select
if at any point two lines connect. Parallel lines never meet;
intersecting lines make v’s; perpendicular lines meet at 90 degrees;
put your hands in the air with me!! intersecting…
perpendicular… They’re rectangular! When two lines will never touch, then you
can tell that those two lines are parallel. Like these telephone wires up above the street,
parallel lines will never meet. Parallel lines never meet;
intersecting lines make v’s; perpendicular lines meet at 90 degrees;
put your hands in the air with me!! Parallel…
intersecting… perpendicular… They’re rectangular! How many chairs can we fit here
‘til we can fit no more? Count with me, “one, two, three, four”:
the perimeter is four. How many tables are there in this cafeteria? There’s only one table in this cafeteria. One square is the area;
one times one is the area. How many chairs can we fit here
to set the table for dinner? One, two, three, four, five, six chairs: that’s
the perimeter. How many tables are there in this cafeteria? One, two tables in the cafeteria:
two squares is the area; one times two is the area. How many chairs can we fit here
so there’s one for every plate? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight:
the perimeter is eight. How many tables are there in this cafeteria? One, two, three tables in the cafeteria:
three squares is the area; one times three is the area. Parallelograms have two sets of parallel lines
Trapezoids only have one set at a time. A rhombus has four sides that are equal. Squares have four equal sides and four right
angles. Quadrilaterals have four sides and four angles:
Parallelograms, rhombuses, trapezoids, squares, and rectangles. And if you add the angles inside each of these,
there will be 360 degrees (360°). Parallelograms have two sets of parallel lines. Trapezoids only have one set at a time. A rectangle has four right angles. A rhombus has four sides that are equal. Squares have four equal sides and four right
angles. Quadrilaterals have four sides and four angles:
Parallelograms, rhombuses, trapezoids, squares, and rectangles. And if you add the angles inside each of these,
There will be three hundred sixty degrees (360°). Isosceles triangles have two equal sides
Like this mountain we’re about to climb; And since one angle’s over ninety degrees,
An obtuse triangle is what we see. If you add up every angle,
There are one hundred eighty degrees in a triangle. If the length is equal on every side,
We say it’s equilateral, like this road sign; And since every angle’s less than 90 degrees,
An acute triangle it will also be. If you add up every angle,
There are one hundred eighty degrees in a triangle. If skateboard ramps are your scene,
with 3 different sides they’re called scalene. That triangle would also be called right
if a ninety degree angle is inside. If you add up every angle,
There are 180 degrees in a triangle. There are two ways to classify triangles:
By their sides and their angles, Like sails out on the high seas
Can be right or isosceles. Or look at the foot of this goose;
It’s scalene and obtuse. When you break pool balls with a cue,
They’re equilateral and acute. If you add up every angle,
There are 180° degrees in a triangle. To find the volume of a cube,
Side x Side x Side will tell you: The number of times a cubic unit
Will be able to fit inside it. Imagine a cube with edges of three. Multiply 3 by 3 by 3 to see
It can fit 27 units …gotta mention that they’re cubic! When finding volume, don’t forget to mention:
The unit is a cube with three dimensions. To get a rectangular prism’s volume right:
length X width x height. Cubic units label three dimensions
when we answer any volume questions. With the dimensions two, three, and six,
First find the base: that’s length times width. The base is six cubes; then multiply the height:
36 cubic units fill it up just right! When finding volume, don’t forget to mention:
The unit is a cube with 3 dimensions. A solid shape made of more than one prism
Has a volume you can find with this wisdom: Think of each shape separately
And find the volume of each individually. Then add the volumes nine and one:
We get ten cubic units and this problem’s done! When finding volume, don’t forget to mention:
The unit is a cube with three dimensions. When finding volume, don’t forget to mention:
The unit is a cube with three dimensions.

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