What Life On Other Planets Would Look and Sound Like

What Life On Other Planets Would Look and Sound Like


– [Narrator] Our planet is just part of an infinite universe. But, unless you’re an astronaut
or best buds with Elon Musk, your chances of ever leaving
Earth are negligible. That didn’t stop scientists from imagining what life would be like
on other planets though. Join us as we explore what
living on other planets would look and sound like. (bright electronic music) Number 10: Mercury. Mercury isn’t only the
closest planet to the sun, it’s also the smallest
one in our solar system. With temperatures ranging from -195 to 800 degrees Fahrenheit,
and nearly constant meteorite impacts, it’d
be a hard place to live. Since the sun is 250% larger
in Mercury’s sky than on Earth, looking up from Mercury’s surface would require some heavy-duty sunglasses. However, as there’s no
atmosphere, there’s nothing to bring color into that
brightly lit night sky, which means that most of the sky is an unobstructed view of space. As is the case in most of space,
nobody can hear you scream, and that’s doubly true
on a planet like Mercury. But, if you could hear
electromagnetic waves, our galaxy would be a very noisy place. And, good ole NASA developed a probe to helps us do just that. By converting electromagnetic vibrations from celestial bodies into sound waves, they made the chatter of
space into something audible. The tone, volume, and
pitch of these sounds are affected by a planet’s
size, speed, and composition. When pointed at Mercury,
the probe sent back this. (eerie noises) Number nine: Venus. With surface temperatures averaging around 900 degrees Fahrenheit, Venus is the hottest
planet in the Milky Way. And, much like its namesake, the Roman goddess of
beauty, it’s a real stunner. But, it’s also under constant assault from volcanic eruptions and acid rain. Even imagining survival
on this hellish planet is beyond NASA’s capabilities. Venus’ thick, heavy atmosphere
means every movement you make would feel you’re 3,000
feet under the sea. And, if you could lift your head, you’d be greeted by a sky
the color of a clementine. Due to the planet’s heavy
cloud cover, however, you’d never get to see the stars. The sun, meanwhile, would only be visible when the atmosphere is at its thinnest. So, while sound would be muffled due to its very thick
atmosphere, it would be audible. Which means, unlike on Mercury, you wouldn’t be stuck
on a planet of mimes. While Mercury sounds like
a rocket blasting off, Venus sounds more like Satan’s
version of the gong show. Just take a listen. (eerie whirring) Number eight: Mars. Similar in size to Earth, the red planet has discernible seasons
and average temperatures ranging from -195 to
68 degrees Fahrenheit. While NASA thinks a Mars
landing is within reach, they do acknowledge that
the planet’s deadly levels of radiation, elevated levels of CO2, and nearly constant dust storms would be difficult to overcome. With an atmosphere just one
percent the thickness of ours, Mars doesn’t have much
in the way of protection. But, it’s just enough to
lend its sky a bit of color. As the sun first crosses the horizon, the planet’s sky is a deep royal blue. As the sun moves westward, that blue slowly slides towards a pinkish-red hue. For a moment at midday,
the sky will be the color of fresh lager, minus the suds. Any time after that, however, the sky is a mixture of
red and burnt orange. As the planet lacks clouds, every night offers a
clear view of the stars. You’d have a tough time
letting out an audible wow of admiration when it came to
those clear skies, however. Mars’ thin atmosphere makes for a poor conductor of sound waves and reduces even the most
poignant plea to a whisper. When scientists turn their
electromagnetic tools towards Mars, it spits back this. (eerie rumbling) Reminds me of the soundtrack
to an old Western flick. Number seven: Jupiter’s moon Europa. First things first, you
couldn’t live on Jupiter. The planet is not only a hotbed of storms but made almost entirely of gas. But, scientists think that
one of its moons, Europa, might be a good place for human life. With low radiation, substantial
amounts of liquid water, and ample geological stability, Europa would be a great
stepping stone into the galaxy. The sky on Europa would be
a wondrous thing to look at. Jupiter would always be visible and take up more than 20
times the space of our moon. Occasionally, the settlers would be able to glance at one of the
gas giant’s other 59 moons as they swirl about the stormy planet. With a gravitational pull
equivalent to our moon, Europa has no real atmosphere to speak of. Therefore, like Mercury, the sky would be little more
than a panorama of space. Even though sound would travel poorly through Europa’s thin atmosphere, settlers might occasionally hear thunder coming off Jupiter’s big red spot. For the most part, however, this moon would leave us forever
trapped in a game of charades. When the NASA Voyager flew by Jupiter and its moons, it captured this. (eerie noises) Why the heck does space sound so creepy? Number six: Saturn’s moon Titan. Because of its rings,
people consider Saturn the jewel of our solar
system, but like Jupiter, there’s no way we could live on it. The planet’s largest moon, Titan, is a different story, however. The only moon in the Milky
Way with a dense atmosphere and adequate cloud cover, it’s
prime for human settlement. Because its surface is free
of storms and cyclones, Titan is also a wonderful
place for sky gazing. Looking up from one of its
many hills would reveal a sky perpetually covered in a tangerine haze. Through squinted eyes,
Saturn and its rings would loom heavy on the horizon. Because of its soupy atmosphere though, you’d be hard pressed to
see much of anything else. Since sound waves have lots of
stuff to bounce off on Titan, it’d be a very noisy place. Because this moon’s atmosphere
is about four times denser than ours, any noise made on
it would be downright alien. When electromagnetic
rays from this super moon are converted into sound waves, you get something that sounds like this. (soft ringing) Number five: Uranus’ moon Miranda. Let’s talk about Uranus, or
one of its moons at least. While a few of the planet’s 27 moons would be suitable for
settlement, NASA scientists agree that Miranda is one of the better options. While it’s bone numbingly cold, averaging around -300 degrees Fahrenheit, Miranda’s jigsaw landscape
is ripe for exploration. This moon’s lack of gravity means that there’s no atmosphere to speak of, and any would-be settler
would find him or herself bombarded by constant radiation. The skies of Miranda, much like Europa, would be clear of clouds and
the color of freshly laid tar. While travelers might
be able to see Uranus, the sun would nothing more than
a bright dot on the horizon. When it comes to communicating,
the lack of an atmosphere means we’re back to playing charades. As for electromagnetic
frequencies however, Uranus itself sounds like this. (eerie whooshing) I was kind of hoping it’d be flatulence. Darn. Number four: Neptune’s moon Triton. As another gas planet,
Neptune doesn’t have much of a surface to speak of. But, its largest moon,
Triton, could be a potential, if not dangerous, site
for human settlement. With average temperatures of
nearly -400 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s also the coldest
object in the Milky way. While Triton’s atmosphere
is thicker than some others on this list, it’s still
not enough to color the sky. While the area closest to the horizon might appear to be
covered in a whitish haze, the rest of the sky would be a deep ebony. Against that nearly
uninterrupted backdrop of space, Neptune would loom in the sky at a size 10 times larger than our moon. While there’s something
for sound to travel through on Triton, it’s not dense
enough to conduct anything but the loudest of noises. So, we’d be stuck in a
perpetual shouting match. Though the moon’s surface might be quiet, its electromagnetic
activity is something else. To be honest, you’ll have a
tough time characterizing it. Just listen. (bizarre noises) Number three: Pluto. Taking roughly 248 years
to make one revolution around the Sun, Pluto is a
frigid, unforgiving planet. Aside from the fact that
you’d face radiation and deadly temperatures,
we don’t know much about this planet beyond
what was discovered by NASA’s New Horizon, which
means it’s one of the places scientists are most excited
to learn more about. The skies of Pluto would differ depending on when you visited. When the dwarf planet
was close to the sun, the frozen gasses in its atmosphere would thaw and give rise
to a thin blue haze. As the planet retreated
from the sun’s rays, the gases around it would refreeze and leave onlookers with
nothing but dark skies. Regardless of the time of year, the sun would be little more
than a dot on the horizon. Due to its flimsy atmosphere, Pluto would be a planet
of maddening silence. Since that’d stop you from
hearing the constant chattering of your teeth, you might
think that’s a blessing. Probes turned towards the
planet have detected noises not unlike a helium-sucking tuning fork. Close your eyes and tell me this doesn’t remind you of choir class. (eerie ringing) Number two: Kepler 186-F. In 2014, NASA uncovered one alien planet that seemed particularly ripe for human habitation: Kepler 186F. While scientists have no
images of the planet’s sky, they’re able to make
some educated guesses. First, due to its sun’s
dimness, its sky would never be brighter than ours
an hour before sunset. While we can’t know much about the color of its sunrises and sunsets, we do know, due to the closeness of the sun, that they’d be crisper and
more enhanced than our own. Though the other planets
in the Kepler system would be just visible in the night sky, it’d be difficult to make them out due to the enhanced size and
glare of the planet’s sun. While we believe its
gravity is strong enough to support a breathable atmosphere, we know nothing about its composition. Therefore, we can’t guess at how our own voices would
sound on Kepler 186-F. Due to its distance, the
electromagnetic recordings we’ve managed are kind of faint. It still sounds pretty alien though. (soft whooshing) Number one: Tatooine. Home to both Luke and Anakin Skywalker, Tatooine is integral to
the Star Wars plot lines. While this desert planet is
as geographically interesting as a brown paper bag, its
sky is a different story. Instead of one star, it has two. Up until recently, scientists believed that such binary systems were impossible; they thought that the
competing gravitational pulls would pull the fledgling planet apart. Now, after discovering a
few binary star systems, they know that they can exist. With that in mind, would
they really be drained dry by the heat of two suns
as George Lucas proposed? Unless it was super
close to one of its suns, scientists don’t think so. While Tatooine’s seasonal variations would be more severe than our
own, scientists don’t think it be quite as dry as the
planet seen on screen. The two suns would lessen the likelihood of cloud cover, however. This means that stunning sunsets like those seen in the
first movie are possible. As to the color of the sky on a scientifically-accurate Tatooine? It’d depend on the planet’s
atmospheric composition. If its atmosphere was made
of similar gasses to our own, you could expect to experience sound similarly to how we do on Earth. When asked about whether
life could survive on a planet like Tatooine, Greg Laughlin, an exoplanet expert, said, “I’d have to say that Tatooine “is the most realistic depiction
of a world in our galaxy.” Looks like Jabba the Hutt
is waiting for us out there. So, is there a particular moon or planet you’d love to visit one day? Or, did one of those
electromagnetic recordings also send shivers down your spine? Let me know your thoughts
in the comments below. And, as always, thanks for watching! (soft music)

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